Education

Restore Creativity – Education should be passion-based


These videos are a must see.  It’s time to take back our public schools and “restore creativity in the classroom”.

Passion, Projects & Play: Restoring Creativity in the Classroom

Jackie Gerstein, Ed.D. (Website) says, “education should be passion-based”.  She continues,

I believe school and after-school programs need to provide kids with a place and space to express themselves.  I believe this place needs to have the following characteristics:

  • There is no agenda, topic for discussion, nor curriculum.
  • It should be non-judgmental  – all ideas and thoughts are accepted, even those that would make adults shutter.
  • There should be opportunities for all kids to have a voice.
  • There should be materials for kids to share their voice in different ways through the spoken word, written word, photography, videography, and other art and music venues.
  • It should be multi-age so the perspectives from different age groups can be shared.
  • The role of the adults and educators in such a setting would be that of active listener and a witness not a teacher nor advice giver.
  • I believe it can be done virtually with a moderator who censures comments and artifacts that do not meet the above criteria.

Do schools kill creativity?

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we’re educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence.

If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.

All kids have tremendous talents — and we squander them pretty ruthlessly.

Creativity now is as important in education as literacy, and we should treat it with the same status.

How to escape education’s death valley

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish — and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational “death valley” we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.


The Flipped Classroom has jumped onto the education radar in recent years as a way to potentially alter pedagogical and instructional practices by utilizing emerging technologies.

In its simplest form, the flipped classroom is a model of learning where students watch content-related videos on their own time, freeing up classroom time for questions and discussion, group work, experiments, and hands-on and other experiential activities.  Check out  Flipped Classroom

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